MURPHY'S LAW

By Patrick Murphy

I’m 40.

Well, not chronologically, but maybe more importantly, biologically.

I read an editorial in the Pittsburgh Post Gazette about age. In particular the age of two quarterbacks. Specifically, the age of Pittsburgh Steelers quarterback Ben Roethlisberger and Tampa Bay quarterback Tom Brady.

Roethlisberger, who will soon turn 39, is deemed old, maybe too old to play football anymore.

Brady, 43, is still going strong, a medical marvel.

So, biologically, I am older than Roethlisberger, but younger than Brady.

One difference between me and these two is Roethlisberger has two more super bowl rings than I do, and Brady has seven more.

Other than that we are about the same.

The editorial sent me to a website, biological-age.com, which calculates your age based on a series of 25 questions.

The queries include age, how much you sleep, what you eat, how active you are, whether you smoke and drink.

Then it uses that data to determine your biological age and tips on how to improve your overall health.

According to my results, to live a healthier life I need:

“Try to sleep regular hours and regular times. Too little sleep is not good for your mind or your body.

“Eating at least five servings of fruit and vegetables a day, everyday. This is essential for general health.

“Try to stick to a mainly plant-based diet with occasional lean meat, fish or chicken.

“Do a few push ups (or similar exercise.)”

Keep in mind all of this is based on the answers you give, which means providing an honest assessment of yourself and your health.

I think I did that, but I am a little leery of the results because of this message I got when I finish the assessment:

“Congratulations! You knocked 9 years off your age!”

Now, math is not my strong suit, but I’m 58, and the assessment says biologically I’m 40. I believe 58-40 is 18, not nine.

But it is a health assessment, not a math test, so who knows.

I’m still going to go with the results because it makes me feel better about myself.

Age is something we all deal with. Father Time is undefeated and catches up to all of us.

It took me way too long to realize that how I treat my body is essential to being able to do all the things I want to do, now and as I age.

I have been eating more plant-based foods and exercising daily, but obviously there are things I can do better.

I can’t complain that I don’t like the taste of some healthy foods since I have very little taste or smell anymore, but my issue is forcing myself to cook.

Unlike Roethlisberger and Brady I can’t afford a nutritionist to prepare meals for me, but until I win a super bowl or two I’m on my own in the kitchen.

Patrick Murphy, editor-publisher of the Humphrey Democrat and Newman Grove Reporter in Nebraska, is a former assistant managing editor at The Telegram.