Two more fall season presentations are coming up as part of the Finney County Historical Museum’s Brown Bag Lunch and Evening at the Museum history lecture series in Garden City, one about a surprising aspect of agriculture and the other focusing on historic and prehistoric stone points, with a chance for members of the audience to get their own arrowheads dated and identified.

The Brown Bag Lunch series offers sessions at noon on the second Wednesday of the month, September through November and January through April. The parallel Evening at the Museum series provides presentations at 7 p.m. each third Tuesday of the same months.

The upcoming lunch-hour session on Nov. 13 will be presented by Amy Whitham, Garden City, addressing the practice of bee-keeping and honey production. Whitham’s program will open with a history by Museum Education Coordinator Johnetta Hebrlee of local honey production and bee keeping, which dates back to the earliest years of agriculture in Finney County.

The upcoming 7 p.m. session on Nov. 19 is to be given by Chad Myers about archeological developments and discoveries in southwest Kansas. Myers is an archeological consultant from Kalvesta who has drawn crowds for two previous presentations about arrowheads and other stone points unearthed in and around Finney County.

As he did during his last program, Myers will attempt to date and identify any arrowheads or other stone implements from southwest Kansas that members of the audience bring.

Admission to each segment is free, with access through the museum’s north entrance. Those who attend are welcome to bring their own lunch or dinner, if they wish, and the museum will provide dessert and beverages.

Previous programs this fall have covered the history of Garden City’s municipal swimming pool, the history of the community’s Warren Hotel, Coca-Cola souvenir and paraphernalia collecting and a screening of “Strangers in Town,” a documentary about Garden City’s history of welcoming and absorbing immigrants from around the world. The schedule of presentations for January through April will be announced soon by the museum.