Kentucky, Florida, Maryland, California, Texas and, on Friday morning, Indiana.

Those are states in 2018 where a student or former student has gone to school with a gun and shot others.

Kansas, thankfully, is not on the list. …

But Columbine and Sandy Hook and Parkland and Santa Fe keep occurring — at schools that think they’re ready when violence happens — and at a rate that makes it time to take a next step.

School districts owe it to their students and families to go beyond what they’ve ever done in terms of school safety. …

This needs to be a coordinated effort, with voices from all levels. …

Law enforcement knows best and worst practices. Parents worry about school safety as much as anyone. Business leaders may have innovations that can work in schools. Everyone needs a voice.

• The conversation is about people inside the schools. More counselors and psychologists, early school budget victims when times are tight, are needed to identify and help students who have signs of mental-health problems. …

Students should receive more encouragement in reporting classmates who exhibit signs of trouble. ... More trained professionals — school resource officers and security guards — may be needed, and should be armed. Not teachers.

• The conversation is about school buildings themselves. …

Metal detectors are used in New York, Los Angeles and some other big-city districts, bringing a sense of security but also a message of an unwelcome environment for students and visitors. Are we to the point they should be in Kansas?

• The conversation is about cost. Adding anything to a safety program will bring price tags of varying weights to school districts. As the Kansas Supreme Court examines the Legislature’s new school funding formula, finding additional money for school safety will be hard — but should be a priority.

• The conversation is about guns. Even if no action is taken at the state or federal level to reduce availability of semi-automatic weapons, guns available in a child’s home are repeatedly an issue. …

• The conversation is about who leads the conversation. Voters hold the key this fall and should look for candidates who advocate solutions, not rest on protecting gun rights. …

Small legislative improvements, without taking away anyone’s guns, are possible and more realistic.

— The Wichita Eagle