November a month to raise awareness about diabetes

11/13/2012

By BARBARA ADDISON and ALLI BURNS

By BARBARA ADDISON and ALLI BURNS

Finney County Extension agents

November is American Diabetes Month. The campaign is a call to action for individuals to take a stand to support the movement to stop diabetes and its consequences. You can reduce your risk for developing type 2 diabetes by improving your diet and increasing your physical activity.

The vision of the American Diabetes Association is a life free of diabetes and all of its burdens. Raising awareness of this ever-growing disease is one of the main efforts behind the mission of the association. American Diabetes Month® (ADM) is an important element in this effort, with programs designed to focus the nation's attention on the issues surrounding diabetes and the many people who are impacted by the disease.

About diabetes

Prevalence:

* Nearly 26 million children and adults in the United States have diabetes.

* Another 79 million Americans have pre-diabetes and are at risk for developing type 2 diabetes.

* Recent estimates project that as many as 1 in 3 American adults will have diabetes in 2050 unless we take steps to stop diabetes.

The toll on health:

* Two out of three people with diabetes die from heart disease or stroke.

* Diabetes is the leading cause of kidney failure.

* Diabetes is the leading cause of new cases of blindness among adults.

* The rate of amputation for people with diabetes is 10 times higher than for people without diabetes.

* About 60 to 70 percent of people with diabetes have mild to severe forms of nerve damage that could result in pain in the feet or hands, slowed digestion, sexual dysfunction and other nerve problems.

Cost of diabetes

* The American Diabetes Association estimates that the total national cost of diagnosed diabetes in the United States is $174 billion.

* Direct medical costs reach $116 billion, and the average medical expenditure among people with diabetes is 2.3 times higher than those without the disease.

* Indirect costs amount to $58 billion (disability, work loss, premature mortality).

* Further published studies suggest that when additional costs for gestational diabetes, pre-diabetes and undiagnosed diabetes are included, the total diabetes-related costs in the U.S. could exceed $218 billion.

* The cost of caring for someone with diabetes is $1 out of every $5 in total health-care costs.

During American Diabetes Month® this November, the American Diabetes Association will launch a socially-focused initiative, "A Day in the Life of Diabetes", to demonstrate the increasing impact diabetes has on families and communities nationwide. Using imagery, social engagement and a larger-than-life stage, light will be shown on the issue of diabetes and those who live with it each and every day. Successfully managing diabetes can be a herculean task, making what might seem like an otherwise ordinary life rather extraordinary.

For more information about American Diabetes Month or diabetes management, please contact Alli Burns, county Extension agent, family consumer and sciences, at the Finney County Extension Office at 272-3670.

Source: American Diabetes Association, www.diabetes.org

Winter Weather Awareness Day

As the days shorten and temperatures drop, thoughts turn to winter weather. The National Weather Service in conjunction with Kansas Emergency Management is observing Wednesday as Winter Weather Awareness Day in Kansas.

"While the short-term outlooks are calling for milder and drier-than-average conditions this winter, it only takes one storm to seriously make your life difficult," said Mary Knapp, state climatologist with Kansas State Research and Extension. "Remember, while the national average for tornado deaths is 70 per year, the national average for deaths on icy or snow-packed roads is more than 1,300, with an additional 100,000 injuries."

Knapp reviewed common terms used in winter forecasts, which come with recommended responses.

* Winter storm: Severe winter conditions, which can vary by the storm. This can include a mix of snow, wind, ice, poor visibility and cold temperatures. Winter storm is coupled with one of the following terms:

* Outlook: Winter storm conditions are possible in the next two to five days. Stay tuned to local media for updates and plan for expected conditions.

* Advisory: Winter weather conditions are expected to cause significant inconveniences and may be hazardous. If you are cautious, these situations should not be life threatening.

* Watch: Winter storm conditions are possible within the next 36 to 48 hours. Prepare now.

* Warning: Life-threatening severe winter conditions have begun or will begin within 24 hours. Act now.

Information about Kansas weather is available on the Weather Data Library website: http://www.ksre.ksu.edu/wdl/. The Weather Data Library is based at Kansas State University. "Weather Wonders" audio reports are available on the K-State Research and Extension News Media and Marketing website at http://www.ksre.ksu.edu/news/.

Achievement Night

Plaques, certificates, medals and pins were the scene at the 2012 4-H Achievement Celebration held at the 4-H building on Sunday. The event will be remembered for the electrical blackout halfway through the program. The event was held to recognize the achievements of 4-H members, leaders and clubs during the 2011-2012 4-H year.

Top awards were given to many outstanding youth from across the county. Achieving the Kansas 4-H Key Award was Katy Clawson from Wide Awake 4-H Club. This award is sponsored by the Kansas 4-H Foundation and Farm Credit of Kansas. "The Top 4- H'ers of the Year" were given to Juniors: Katie Mongeau, Tristan Clark; Intermediates: Kyle Hammond, Abby Murrell; Seniors: Kaitlynn Hammond, Josh Irsik.

Clubs were recognized for achieving 4-H Club Seal awards. The Finney County 4-H Alumni award was presented to Bill McNeill along with the Friends of 4-H award being received by Steve Hoffman, for Crop Production Services.

Sponsors for the 4-H Celebration include the Finney County 4-H Foundation for medals and certificate awards and the Garden City Co-op for sponsoring the 4-H Club record keeping awards, secretary, treasurer, reporter and historian. The Garden City Co-op also helps sponsor part of the evening's meal. Thanks to the Finney Flyers and Sherlock Strivers 4-H Clubs for being host for the event.

The 4-H members and clubs put forth time and dedication all year in order to achieve honors. The honors were given in various areas to members from throughout the county.

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