The Garden City Telegram
7/18/2013
SOUTHWEST LIFE

Classtime Briefs

New scholarship created for Finney County students

By The Telegram

A new University of Kansas scholarship will benefit Latino students from Finney County who are interested in studying journalism and communications, thanks to the generosity of Fred J. Salinas, of Houston.

The Fred J. Salinas Family Scholarship will be awarded for the first time in fall 2014.

A KU alumnus, Salinas earned a bachelor's degree in journalism in 1979. He is president and owner of Friendly Ford in Crosby, Texas, a suburb of Houston. Salinas' son, Austin, also is a KU alumnus, having earned a bachelor's degree in political science from KU in 2008. Fred Salinas has led a successful career in the automobile industry and attributes much of that success to the education he received at KU.

"For me, to be able to give back to the University of Kansas is an honor. Coming from southwest Kansas from a humble background, and to be able to assist a young student in accomplishing his or her goal makes me proud," Salinas said. "KU is a top-tier state university with all the resources students need to fulfill their education."

Ann Brill, dean of the William Allen White School of Journalism at KU, expressed appreciation for the gift.

"We are so grateful to Fred Salinas for this¬ scholarship," Brill said. "It is a wonderful gift and will add to our ability to recruit a more diverse group of students. We also are proud of the success that Mr. Salinas has had following his graduation from the School of Journalism."

The Fred J. Salinas Family Scholarship is an endowed fund that will generate annual tuition support for Latino journalism students in perpetuity. Students may apply as incoming freshmen; as current students at KU; or as transfer students from community colleges. In order to qualify for the scholarship, applicants must demonstrate financial need and maintain a 3.4 grade-point average to continue receiving scholarship assistance. Students interested in applying should contact the journalism school at (785) 864-4755.

The gift counts toward Far Above: The Campaign for Kansas, the university's $1.2 billion comprehensive fundraising campaign. Far Above seeks support to educate future leaders, advance medicine, accelerate discovery and drive economic growth to seize the opportunities of the future. The campaign is managed by KU Endowment, the independent, nonprofit organization serving as the official fundraising and fund-management organization for KU.

Area students among K-State graduates

MANHATTAN — Nearly 3,000 students completed degree requirements from Kansas State University this spring.

The graduates are from 103 Kansas counties, 48 states and 41 countries.

Area students earning degrees include:

Finney County

Garden City: Ashley Adams, bachelor of arts; Kimberly Allen, bachelor of science in business administration; Benjamin Boyles, bachelor of science in industrial engineering; Kaitlyn Dechant, bachelor of arts; Seth Drees, bachelor of science; Larissa Hall, bachelor of science in biological systems engineering; Bradly Hoggatt, bachelor of science in business administration; Michael Kempke, master of agribusiness; Joseph Lightner, master of public health; Katherine Pearson, master of science in academic advising.

Holcomb: Jeffrey Rivers, bachelor of science; Kenneth Sabourin, bachelor of science in mechanical engineering.

Grant County

Ulysses: Andrew Anderson, bachelor of science in mechanical engineering; Tannis Anderson, bachelor of science; Carlos Barron, bachelor of science in business administration; Lyndsey Gray, bachelor of science in agriculture; Brooke Klebe, bachelor of science in education; Javier Porras, bachelor of science in architectural engineering; Christopher Wagner, master of agribusiness.

Gray County

Cimarron: Kyle Ast, bachelor of science in agriculture; Drew Harp, bachelor of arts.

Copeland: Jada Jackson, bachelor of science.

Montezuma: Audrey Holderness, bachelor of science in agriculture.

Greeley County

Tribune: Kyle Schneider, bachelor of science in agriculture.

Hamilton County

Syracuse: William Brown, bachelor of science in education; Ryan Dowell, bachelor of science; Marisa Howell, bachelor of science in business administration; Dalton Simon, bachelor of science in technology management.

Haskell County

Satanta: Shelby Hill, bachelor of science in agriculture; Heather Walden, bachelor of science in family studies and human services.

Sublette: Brett Holloway, bachelor of science in business administration; Zachary Ricketts, bachelor of science in mechanical engineering; Mallory Weidner, bachelor of science in education.

Kearny County

Lakin: Zachary Anthony, bachelor of science; Gene Einspahr, bachelor of science; John Garvey, bachelor of science in agriculture; Becca Landgraf, bachelor of science in agriculture; Jeremy Millershaski, bachelor of science in agribusiness; Victor Moreno, bachelor of science; Kirstie Rooney, bachelor of science in food science and industry; William Rooney, bachelor of science; Eryka Stabel, bachelor of science in business administration and bachelor of science.

Scott County

Scott City: Justin Bremer, bachelor of science; Tyrel George, bachelor of science in mechanical engineering; Michael Hickey, bachelor of science; Ian Huck, bachelor of science; Amber Kuckelman, bachelor of science in family studies and human services; Tawnia Smith, bachelor of science; Sierra Zemke, bachelor of science in education.

Stanton County

Johnson City: Clinton Josserand, bachelor of science in business administration.

Manter: Kylee Steimel, bachelor of science in family studies and human services.

Stevens County

Hugoton: Brittany Intres, bachelor of science in education; Yates Musgrove, bachelor of science; Wayne DeCamp, bachelor of music.

Moscow: Blake White, bachelor of science in mechanical engineering; Quincy Whitham, bachelor of science.

Wichita County

Leoti: Allison Koops, bachelor of science in family studies and human services; Jordan Kreutzer, bachelor of science in mechanical engineering; Ashley Wagner, bachelor of science.

G.C. students complete Mars Academy

HUTCHINSON — David Sanjuan, son of Armando and Floribeta Sanjuan, Elijahblu Ruiz-Hernandez, son of Misty Ruiz-Hernandez, Aaron Canales, son of Karen Canales, and Enrique Chairez, son of Enrique and Juanity Chairez, all of Garden City, graduated from the Camp KAOS Mars Academy program June 9 at the Kansas Cosmosphere and Space Center. The students will all be entering seventh grade this fall.

Mars Academy is a three-day overnight camp for students entering sixth and seventh grades. Developed by Cosmosphere staff, the Mars Academy program engages students in the challenges of exploring the planet Mars, while emphasizing teamwork and problem solving in a fast-paced, science, technology, engineering, and math-based learning environment. As part of the program, Mars Academy campers learn the geology, climate and environmental conditions that exist on the Red Planet. Campers launch rockets, guide a programmed robot around an obstacle course and create a custom-designed mission patch. Campers also tour the Cosmosphere's Hall of Space Museum and experience educational presentations in the Cosmosphere's Justice Planetarium, Dr. Goddard's Lab, and the Carey Digital Dome Theater. The camp culminates with a simulated robotic mission requiring each team member to assume a critical role for mission success.

The Cosmosphere offers camp programs for students as young as those entering second grade, and on through high school. Camps are available for adults, including the Intergenerational Camp Experience for adults and their children or grandchildren. Additional camp experiences are offered for groups, and schools can custom-design curriculum based on state education standards. The Cosmosphere also has programs designed specifically for Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts, Webelos and the American Heritage Girls.

The Cosmosphere's Camp KAOS program features five progressive levels for students entering seventh grade. Campers begin with Space 101 and 201, which are held at the Cosmosphere and visit other nearby facilities. They move on to Space 301, which includes a trip to Johnson Space Center in Houston, for a behind-the-scenes tour of NASA's astronaut training facilities. Those who progress to Space 401 travel to Kennedy Space Center in Florida, where campers experience NASA launch facilities. The most advanced campers in Space 501 focus on emerging space technology facilities in California. For camp information visit www.cosmospherecamps.org.

For more information about the Cosmosphere and the Carey Digital Dome Theater, visit www.cosmo.org.