DEAR ANNIE: My little sister moved to the town where I live a few months ago. My husband and I regularly invite her to hang out with our group of friends, and we have some family here, too, whom we see. She and I have a lot in common, with very similar taste in books and movies and a penchant for talking too much. She's single and more proactive about finding things to do, and she's started cutting us out of social gatherings she plans — with friends she met through us and with our family members — because she says I "overshadow" her. I haven't resorted to singing that "Beaches" song to her yet, but I'm pretty burnt on her trying to leave me out of my own social circle. What should I do? — The Cooler Sister

DEAR COOLER SISTER: She might be the wind beneath your wings, but she still needs a chance to spread her own. She is new to the area and probably wants to establish an identity outside of just being your younger sister. That doesn't mean she doesn't love you or want to spend time with you. In fact, I'm sure you're a big part of why she moved there in the first place. Just give her time.

DEAR ANNIE: My heart goes out to the obese stepbrother who was the subject of a recent letter. He has probably been given lots of unhelpful advice and plenty of scorn. Your suggestion to check for an underactive thyroid was not bad, but there is much more he can do.

Many morbidly obese individuals have had amazing success with a ketogenic diet, which allows them to lose weight without experiencing the hunger that typically accompanies low-calorie diets. The old advice to "move more and eat less" sounds sensible, but it rarely works for more than a short time because it requires immense willpower, leaves a person feeling hungry all the time and ruins his or her metabolism.

On the other hand, a well-formulated ketogenic diet, after a few days of adaptation, causes a person to feel quite satisfied and energized. It often normalizes blood sugar, blood pressure and lipid profiles, allowing people to reduce or eliminate medications while losing weight. Because it is high in natural fats, many doctors still advise against it, but that is beginning to change as research and clinical experience show the safety and efficacy of the diet in both the short term and the long term. You would be doing this man, his sister and many others a huge favor if you would mention "keto" (otherwise known as low-carb/high-fat) to your readers. — A Keto Fan

DEAR KETO FAN: Thank you for the tip. I was not aware of the keto diet. I encourage curious readers to do their research and talk to their doctors to decide whether it might be a good fit for them.

Send your questions for Annie Lane to dearannie@creators.com. To find out more about Annie Lane and read features by other Creators Syndicate columnists and cartoonists, visit the Creators Syndicate website at www.creators.com.