Fireworks change worth celebrating

Firework ban "not wanted."

I have lived in the Holcomb/Garden City area all my life. I have enjoyed the city's firework display throughout the years. However, I have never enjoyed the Fourth of July as much as I have this year. The aerial fireworks were spectacular. I think that the citizens of Finney County should applaud our city and county commissioners for making it legal to purchase these fireworks and to enjoy them throughout the city. I also want to thank Garden City Fire Department Chief Allen Shelton and the 31 firemen who worked on this holiday to ensure the safety of our citizens, homes and land.

Chief Shelton was correct when he said "I'm sure we had a bunch of people in the community with their buckets and water hoses." I, and other neighbors, had our water hoses turned on and easily accessible throughout the week. There was no monetary loss to anyone in the city or county that night due to fireworks, for that matter, the whole week.

Being a commissioner, whether city or county, means taking into consideration the people's wishes. I think our commissioners allowed the citizens to enjoy this holiday for more than one or two nights because that's what the "majority" want. I enjoyed watching the aerial fireworks throughout the week from my own yard. On the Fourth of July, my husband and I drove to an area where there were no houses, yet we could still see the city. In every direction we looked, there was the most beautiful aerials in the sky. We enjoyed this view for a solid two hours.

Continued education on safety procedures that the citizens can follow to ensure less injuries and fires is a better solution than "banning" fireworks. It is quite apparent that the "majority" of the citizens wanted fireworks this year. I can sympathize with those citizens who did not enjoy the past week, for various reasons. However, in a democracy such as ours, the wishes of the "majority" rule. The commissioners did a great job this year. I hope the ban will remain lifted in the future.

I think that County Commissioner Roman Halbur owes our Chief Shelton an apology for saying "If he was doing his job, fireworks would be banned."

Thank you Garden City for a wonderful Fourth of July.

BEVERLY COATES,

Garden City

County attorneys support Jennings

The five area county attorneys of the 122nd District House of Representatives district have endorsed Russ Jennings as their choice for state representative.

Russ Jennings has broad-based experience and a proven track record in public safety. Russ has served four years as a law enforcement officer, including two years as Undersheriff of Kearny County. He served as Kearny County Magistrate Judge for 13 years and has served as Kansas Commissioner of Juvenile Justice with distinction for four years. As a Cabinet member for two governors, Russ has proved that state agencies can be increasingly effective while reducing their cost of operation at the same time. Russ also has experience in the challenges facing local government as he has served as a Department Head in Finney County as Director of the Southwest Kansas Juvenile Detention Center for 13 years and as a member of the Lakin City Council for eight years. Russ Jennings is respected in our state capitol and will represent the interests of our district well.

County attorneys joining me in the endorsement of Jennings are: Robert H. Gale Jr., Hamilton County; Dennis C. Jones, Kearny County; Lynn Koehn, Haskell County; and Charles Moser, Greeley County.

JOHN P. WHEELER JR.,

Garden City

Wheeler is county attorney for Finney County.

Correct issues at new school

"Safety and security!" That, according to Dr. Atha, Garden City Telegram July 10, is the reason there is only one entrance into the new high school. All buses, district patrons, faculty going to work, parents letting off children for school and students driving to school will be safer with only one driveway, in the mornings before school starts, and in the afternoons when school is over for the day? And then there is game night. Maybe upwards of 4,000 people, perhaps more, trying to get in and out of their child's activity, on time, with no accident. BOE members, this point was brought up and discussed, the night you made the decision to spend the leftover bond money on iPads. That driveway is not safer today than it was then, and won't be safer in August, either. The reason a second street, or drive, was rejected, is the people of the area it was originally planned for, objected to so much traffic in their neighborhood. Please right this problem before a tragedy happens and it can't be reversed.

JANETT BRUSH,

Garden City